Lamb Kabobs

Many Varieties

(recipe contributed by Garry Vroegh <a043140t@bc.seflin.org>)

The best cut to use for lamb kabobs is the leg; the next best choice is the shoulder cuts with the fat removed. The cubes should be cut into 1 to 1½ inch cubes. Marinate the meat overnight to as long as 48 hours for best results.

For rare and juicy meat, place the cubes close to one another on the skewers; to cook the meat well done or crispy on the outside, space the cubes farther apart. For more flavor with very lean mean, put lamb fat between the pieces of the lean meat on the skewers. Cooking the meat and vegetables on separate skewers will produce the best results, allowing you to accomodate the different cooking times of various vegetables. After stringing the kabobs, brushing with good olive oil helps brown the meat and vegetables and will prevent sticking to the grill surface. Salt and pepper is the only additional spices you need after the marinade.

Lamb kabobs are a staple dish in Southern Europe and the Middle East. Try variations of the basic kabob by adding these spices to the marinade of your choice.

Greek
Add oregano and sage to the marinade. Cook with quarters of onions and green peppers.
Iranian
Cut the pieces of meat about an inch thick and wide, and 2½ to 3 inches long. Marinate in yoghurt and thyme and grill with the yoghurt as the baste. The dish is served with rice, radishes, and onions on the side.
Lebanese
Add mint and thyme to the basic marinade. The typical veggies are green pepper squares, onions, and tomatoes.
Romanian
Oregano is the added spice. The veggies are eggplant cut into cubes, with tomatos and green pepper.
Turkish
Add crushed bay leaves to the marinade and also sprinkle on the kabobs. Sweet bread, onions, and tomatoes are the usual accompaniment.

Return to Sheep's Creek Farm Lamb Recipes page.

© 1998 Ronald Florence
Last modified: 29-Nov-2001 10:59:10 EST